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About Traditional Art / Hobbyist Member CoralFemale/Canada Recent Activity
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Jack Shadbolt was one of those artists who never flagged in his pursuit of variety. A great reader, writer, speaker, teacher, wanderer, visitor to museums and observer of nature.  

While an artist's hand may naturally slip toward homeostasis and repetition, the human heart reaches for variety and novelty. Whether our work is representational or abstract, monumental or modest, here are a few of Jack's thoughts... :

Make a little thing and then a large one. 

Make a simple shape and then a complex one.

Make conjoining edges soft, hard, run over, or falling short. 

When repeating motifs, vary size and direction.

Don't fear winking, blinking, teasing, humming humour.

Cruise the work for further potentials for imagery.

Obfuscate, cover up, smudge or overhaul boring passages.

Make gradations where possible, both wet and dry.

Mix things up--numbers, owls, flags, butterflies. 

Look for opportunities to monumentalize and feature.

Let motifs cross over and interfere with other motifs.

Look for things that suggest other things, and hint further.

Relish the opulence, lusciousness and seduction of paint.

Point, and let things react against one another.

Patch, and let things lie close and love each other.

Try to think of and live in the fineries of Nature: cocoons, flowers, birds, butterflies, eggs, reflections, leaves, sticks, bones, echoes, etc. Think also of emblems, badges, mandalas, signs, glyphs, totems, birth, wonder, light. Rawness, death, decay and disfigurement also have their place. Life and art is a bombardment of variety.  

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bluecnidaria
Coral
Artist | Hobbyist | Traditional Art
Canada
I studied fish. Not those charismatic mega fauna better known as whales. Everyone wants to be a marine biologist and swim with the whales. I never studied whales. I studied fish, weightless in a three-dimensional world. A beautiful biodiversity, each with a niche carved out perfectly in time and space, their bounty made scarce in man’s ever increasing technology and the gaping maw of humankind. I spent my whole life listening to the tides, the wind, the water, and halyard clanking against wooden masts. And in that time I never really liked the out of doors, instead I drew pictures and painted and I collected fruit stickers, those little things that painstakingly get put on ever piece of fruit, and then have to be peeled off again so you don’t choke on them. I would put them in my sketch book, like a colourful flat plastic fruit salad. But somehow the further I got from my aquatic beginnings, the deeper entrenched into the scholastic world of paper, and ink stains, desks and computer screens.... the more the earth called to me and I ended up studying fish, living in field camps, loving the out of doors and getting really wet and muddy chasing fish.

“But remember always, as I told you at first, that this is all a fairy tale, and only fun and pretense; and, therefore, you are not to believe a word of it, even if it is true. “
- Charles Kingsley (Water Babies)
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:iconcarolynym:
Beautiful gallery
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:iconjohnpaulthornton:
Great journal.

Thank you for appreciating missing child 9.
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:iconlouise-art:
Thanks for the fave :sun:
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:iconzeldis:
Thank you very much!
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:iconjanie-g:
Hi,thanks for the fave on Glacier. I love your gallery. :)
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:iconinvisibly-touched:
Just wanted to thank you, sorry this is late - and you work is BEAUTIFUL - love your watercolors especially
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:iconmirrorplex:
Thank you for your comment! You have an awesome gallery!
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:iconsarachmet:
Thank you very much for your comment, I really appreciate your warm words, thank you! :sun:
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